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Potty Talk with Patty Potty

January 20, 2020
TEXAS’S NO WIPES IN THE PIPES CAMPAIGN You may have heard of a spokeswoman who goes by the name of “Patty Potty,” preaching the good word of toilet etiquette in cities across the state of Texas.  Armed with a bright pink plunger and styled as a 1950s housewife, Patty Potty aims to educate the public about the dangers of putting objects into the toilet that are not one of the three Ps: pee, poo, and (toilet) paper.  She visits classrooms, industry conferences, and district board meetings. The “No Wipes in the Pipes” campaign began in 2014 in an effort to inform the population of the dangers of flushing wipes that are falsely advertised as “flushable.” “People are flushing all kinds of things down the toilet!” Patty points out. “It’s not a trash can, you know!  Some paper products and wipes are advertised as ‘flushable’ but they aren’t. Sure, they will flush down, but they won’t flush OUT.  Wipes don’t decompose… they get caught up in wastewater treatment plant screens and filters — and that costs money to clear and repair!”1 Those in the wastewater industry are familiar with the cleanup that is associated with products that are incorrectly flushed down the lines.  As evidenced by the large amounts of rag material USST crews have removed over the years from various pipes and structures, these materials get caught in a facility’s screens, filters, and put undue stress on infrastructure. Patty Potty was created to educate people in a fun way and encourages other cities to follow suit.  She offers products that cities can use to educate their citizens including mailing inserts, flyers, bumper stickers, coloring books, magnets, and bags, just to name a few.  Her products fund the campaign, along with sponsorship packages that are available to purchase.  You can follow her on Facebook or Twitter, and you can catch all of her videos, including a newer campaign promoting the dangers of fats, oils, and greases, on her YouTube channel. Spread the word and take the pledge with Patty:  No wipes in the pipes! 1 https://www.pattypotty.com/about-patty-potty/
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August 19, 2019

Florida Braces for Flooding as Downpours Continue

HEAVY RAINFALL, FLOODING, AND THE IMPACT ON COLLECTION AND TREATMENT INFRASTRUCTURE Heavy downpours continued over the weekend, making this summer one of the wettest some parts of Florida have seen in a long time.  Last week, drivers needed rescuing from their cars stranded in rising waters in Orange County when more than 4-inches of rain fell.  In Miami-Dade, nearly 6-inches fell in one hour, causing flash flooding while flood warnings were issued across most of West, Central and South Florida. What’s different about this type of flash flooding and rainfall and the impact it has on wastewater treatment infrastructure? Most

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September 18, 2017

Storm Season Is In Full Swing – Are You Prepared?

The Impact of Hurricane Floods on Wastewater Treatment Plants With two heavy-hitting hurricanes recently battering both Texas and Florida, wastewater treatment plants across the country can learn from what’s happening in these areas to prepare for the potential impact of flooding, storm surges, and other extreme weather on their own systems. In addition to causing billions of dollars of damage from wind and rain, storm surges and flooding from hurricanes Harvey and Irma have wreaked havoc in cities and wastewater treatment plants along the coastlines.  In Palm Beach, Florida, crews were out maintaining and repairing lift stations before, during and

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April 4, 2017

Utility Maintenance: How Debris Gets Into a Facility

Ever wonder how debris gets into your facility? The United States has between 700,000 and 800,000 miles of underground pipe that ranges from six inches to 240 inches in diameter. This aging infrastructure allows for debris to move through a waste collection system due to cracks and joints in the pipe. Debris can be naturally occurring or litter. Natural occurring debris includes sand and grit; litter includes fats, oils and greases. Litter debris has been discarded into the wastewater by users of the system —commercial or residential. Debris accumulates in structures throughout wastewater collection and treatment systems such as pipes, manholes, lift stations,

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December 1, 2014

Congratulations to the Florida Rural Water Association!

U.S. Submergent Technologies congratulates the Florida Rural Water Association on their recent recognition of “Association of the Year” by the National Rural Water Association.  The award was presented at the NRWA’s annual Tribute to Excellence Awards as part of the WaterPro Conference on Monday, October 6, in Seattle, WA.  According to the press release, NRWA director Kent Watson commended the FRWA on their “endeavors to achieve as much as possible with the resources available for their membership, which is over 2,000.” He goes on to say that, “Their Board of Directors, membership and a vast number of programs and services

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